Heartwarming Portraits of Newborn Babies Smiling Sweetly


West Ealing, London-based photographer Sandi Ford has perfected the art of capturing a baby’s precious smile in enchantingly sweet portraits of sleeping newborns. Curled up on soft blankets, these bundles of joy make for a heartwarming sight with their fluffy wisps of hair, soft skin, innocent faces, and infectious grins. The photographer waits for the telltale signs that an infant is going to smile—flickering eyes and funny facial expressions—and waits patiently so she can capture precisely the right moment with her camera.
Ford, who has won several awards for her newborn photography, says the best part of her job is being a part of each family’s story. “For many families, I am photographing their first child and I am often their first trip out after coming home from hospital,” the photographer shares on PetaPixel. “These pictures go on the walls, they are a legacy, and I helped tell that story. It’s a gift I never take for granted.”
Sandi Ford’s website
Sandi Ford’s blog…

Source: www.mymodernmet.com

See on Scoop.itLe It e Amo ✪

Annunci

Heartwarming Portraits of Newborn Babies Smiling Sweetly


West Ealing, London-based photographer Sandi Ford has perfected the art of capturing a baby’s precious smile in enchantingly sweet portraits of sleeping newborns. Curled up on soft blankets, these bundles of joy make for a heartwarming sight with their fluffy wisps of hair, soft skin, innocent faces, and infectious grins. The photographer waits for the telltale signs that an infant is going to smile—flickering eyes and funny facial expressions—and waits patiently so she can capture precisely the right moment with her camera.
Ford, who has won several awards for her newborn photography, says the best part of her job is being a part of each family’s story. “For many families, I am photographing their first child and I am often their first trip out after coming home from hospital,” the photographer shares on PetaPixel. “These pictures go on the walls, they are a legacy, and I helped tell that story. It’s a gift I never take for granted.”
Sandi Ford’s website
Sandi Ford’s blog…

Source: www.mymodernmet.com

See on Scoop.itLe Panda De Cina ✪

Blind Painter Relies on Touch and Texture to Create Stunningly Vivid Paintings


While art has always been a major part of John Bramblitt’s life, it wasn’t until he completely lost his sight that he tried to paint for the first time. From the age of 11, Bramblitt’s vision was gradually stolen from him by epilepsy. By the time he was 30, seizures had rendered him completely blind, sending him into what he calls “the deepest, darkest hole” of depression. “All of the hopes and dreams that I had for my life; all of the plans for what I would do after I graduated school were gone. I was not only depressed, but in mourning. The life that I had, along with the future that I was planning, was dead and gone,” he says. “I felt like I had no potential; that basically I was a zero.”
It was then, at the lowest point of his life, that Bramblitt resolved to get colors back in his life. A year after he became fully blind, he attempted to learn how to draw without sight by using a kind of fabric paint with raised edges. And although he says his first successful drawing was…

Source: www.mymodernmet.com

See on Scoop.itLe It e Amo ✪

Blind Painter Relies on Touch and Texture to Create Stunningly Vivid Paintings


While art has always been a major part of John Bramblitt’s life, it wasn’t until he completely lost his sight that he tried to paint for the first time. From the age of 11, Bramblitt’s vision was gradually stolen from him by epilepsy. By the time he was 30, seizures had rendered him completely blind, sending him into what he calls “the deepest, darkest hole” of depression. “All of the hopes and dreams that I had for my life; all of the plans for what I would do after I graduated school were gone. I was not only depressed, but in mourning. The life that I had, along with the future that I was planning, was dead and gone,” he says. “I felt like I had no potential; that basically I was a zero.”
It was then, at the lowest point of his life, that Bramblitt resolved to get colors back in his life. A year after he became fully blind, he attempted to learn how to draw without sight by using a kind of fabric paint with raised edges. And although he says his first successful drawing was…

Source: www.mymodernmet.com

See on Scoop.itLe Panda De Cina ✪

DDITATANN-92 http://ow.ly/i/a2MmY


DDITATANN-92 http://ow.ly/i/a2MmY

Portuguese Street Artist Decorates Electrical Box with Ornate Tile Patterns


By adding decorative tile designs to this electrical box, Portuguese artist Diogo Machado helps passersby look beyond urban infrastructure to appreciate the culture that underlies industrial drudgery. The artist, who also uses the pseudonym Add Fuel, used symmetrical stencils inspired by azulejos — Portuguese tiles — to paint this utility box located in a gentrified neighborhood in the city of Lisbon.
The piece was completed as part of a neighborhood revitalization effort led by nonprofit Mistaker Maker. Interestingly, Machado left part of the box’s original surface intact, complete with graffiti. This detail points to a collision between the area’s deteriorating infrastructure and a resurgence of the arts.
On the surface, the patterns appear ornately traditional and classic in design. However, upon closer inspection, it becomes apparent that Machado blends pop culture symbols and surprising pictures into the motif. In this piece, for instance, the decadent blue swirls turn out to be…

Source: www.mymodernmet.com

See on Scoop.itLe It e Amo ✪

Portuguese Street Artist Decorates Electrical Box with Ornate Tile Patterns


By adding decorative tile designs to this electrical box, Portuguese artist Diogo Machado helps passersby look beyond urban infrastructure to appreciate the culture that underlies industrial drudgery. The artist, who also uses the pseudonym Add Fuel, used symmetrical stencils inspired by azulejos — Portuguese tiles — to paint this utility box located in a gentrified neighborhood in the city of Lisbon.
The piece was completed as part of a neighborhood revitalization effort led by nonprofit Mistaker Maker. Interestingly, Machado left part of the box’s original surface intact, complete with graffiti. This detail points to a collision between the area’s deteriorating infrastructure and a resurgence of the arts.
On the surface, the patterns appear ornately traditional and classic in design. However, upon closer inspection, it becomes apparent that Machado blends pop culture symbols and surprising pictures into the motif. In this piece, for instance, the decadent blue swirls turn out to be…

Source: www.mymodernmet.com

See on Scoop.itLe Panda De Cina ✪

Powerful Ads Remind Us a Woman’s Worth Isn’t Measured by Clothes


There’s the old adage that “clothes don’t make the man,” and so why should they have to make the woman? Swiss feminist group Terre des Femmes and the Miami Ad School in Hamburg, Germany recently created an advertising campaign that begs the question. Called A Woman’s Worth, it features three posters demonstrating the ridiculous notions people often have regarding a woman’s attire and her body.
Each powerful image features a different body part – legs, chest, and feet – and has a “ruler” on it that signifies the length of a skirt, height of a neckline and heel. But instead of the measurements conveying inches or centimeters, the markers include terms like, “prude” and “asking for it.” Depending on where your dress falls (or doesn’t fall), people will unfairly judge you for it.
A Woman’s Worth points out the absurdity of these measurements, and implores us to think beyond the style that a person is wearing. Someone’s value is not dependent on their clothing, and it shouldn’t be an…

Source: www.mymodernmet.com

See on Scoop.itLe It e Amo ✪

Powerful Ads Remind Us a Woman’s Worth Isn’t Measured by Clothes


There’s the old adage that “clothes don’t make the man,” and so why should they have to make the woman? Swiss feminist group Terre des Femmes and the Miami Ad School in Hamburg, Germany recently created an advertising campaign that begs the question. Called A Woman’s Worth, it features three posters demonstrating the ridiculous notions people often have regarding a woman’s attire and her body.
Each powerful image features a different body part – legs, chest, and feet – and has a “ruler” on it that signifies the length of a skirt, height of a neckline and heel. But instead of the measurements conveying inches or centimeters, the markers include terms like, “prude” and “asking for it.” Depending on where your dress falls (or doesn’t fall), people will unfairly judge you for it.
A Woman’s Worth points out the absurdity of these measurements, and implores us to think beyond the style that a person is wearing. Someone’s value is not dependent on their clothing, and it shouldn’t be an…

Source: www.mymodernmet.com

See on Scoop.itLe Panda De Cina ✪

#fast #cat #help #africa #kenya #little #elephant See it here:


#fast #cat #help #africa #kenya #little #elephant See it here:#fast #cat #help #africa #kenya…
via Tumblr http://bit.ly/1GFV4nO